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DEIC Members

Lauren Cirrincione

Lauren Cirrincione

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy,
Faculty Co-Chair of DEIC

Email: lc10@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I want to help ensure UWSOP is a safe and inclusive environment for everyone. The DEIC is at the forefront of this effort.

Why is DEI important to you?
As a pharmacist, my goal is to improve health equity and reduce health disparities for all patients. I believe diverse healthcare teams are vital for achieving this goal.

Work group: Training


djump@uw.edu

Diana Velasco

HR Manager, Staff Co-Chair of DEIC

Email: djump@uw.edu


Cee Adamson

Cee Adamson

SOP Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator

Email: adamsonc@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I am thrilled to join the DEIC in support of the School of Pharmacy’s DEI initiatives. I eagerly look forward to collaborating with members of the UWSOP and the broader UW communities to ensure that we move to do ‘the next right thing’.

Why is DEI important to you?
As a student, educator, administrator, and practitioner I foster inclusive communities where individuals are valued, safe, and heard. As such, as I work to value the celebration, exploration, and understanding among people, ideas, and cultures. This value is exemplified through the creation of a safe and courageous environment for all students, staff, and faculty to explore identities of self and others, promoting a life-long commitment to successful living in a global community; and ensuring that policies, programs, and services are inclusive and reflect the diversity of our community.


Saveena Ahmed

Saveena Ahmed

Program Operations Analyst

Email: saveena1@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I became a DEI member because having voices at the table from different backgrounds is important and society needs more voices like mine. I also feel that, though we have made great efforts to acknowledge inequalities on campus, there are still opportunities to improve our environment, experiences, and inclusivity.

Why is DEI important to you?
DEI is important to me because it directly affects our work and we (at UW, the Seattle area, and Washington state) are a fairly diverse community. I feel that creating more opportunity for diversity within Faculty, staff and students will help meet the needs of our ever growing and changing community and to help identify what resources may be needed and where they can be applied equitably.

Work groups: Communication & Community


Caitlin Blomquist

Caitlin Blomquist

Director of Advising and Student Success

Email: cmb23@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
After attending the inaugural AACP Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Institute with several DEIC members and learning more about the DEIC, I wanted to become more involved in the School’s DEI work. In particular, I am excited to help build a sense of community and inclusion across different departments and different roles (students, faculty, staff, preceptors, etc.).

Why is DEI important to you?
I believe I have a duty to integrate an equity and anti-racist lens into my work in order to truly support students’ holistic success.

Work groups: Communication & Community


Scott Braswell

Scott Braswell

Director of Marketing and Communications

Email: braswels@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I want to help give voice to DEI efforts and needs within our School to evolve and nurture an inclusive, supportive learning environment. I’m also grateful to be part of such a collaborative team of faculty, students and staff devoted to the same mission.

Why is DEI important to you?
In an increasingly polarized political and cultural landscape, championing diversity, equity and inclusion is essential, and its importance is something that transcends and reaches far beyond the classroom and campus community.

Work group: Communication & Community


Sara Khor

Sara Khor

PhD Student

Email: khors@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I would like to explore ways to include more DEI training in our curriculum to better prepare future healthcare clinicians, leaders, and researchers to incorporate equity in their work and decisions.

Why is DEI important to you?
Inequity and social injustice are embedded within our systems and institutions. I truly believe that the DEI lens needs to be incorporated in everything that we do, whether it is hiring, designing curriculum, or department planning. It is only by doing so that we can begin to dismantle structural injustice and create an environment that can benefit all people.

Work group: Curriculum & Policy


Yvonne Lin

Yvonne Lin

Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics

Email: yvonlin@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I want to: contribute to fostering an inclusive, equitable and accepting environment in the SOP; be better educated and aware of DEI issues that affect our students, staff, faculty, patients and the greater community; and help make tangible changes to improve our campus and society.

Why is DEI important to you?
Fundamentally, a lack of diversity has far-reaching impacts on educational outcomes, physical well-being, mental health, and perpetuates inequities and marginalization. I believe DEI is an important part of a thriving, dynamic and creative environment and dismantling barriers that continue to exist in our society.

Work group: Curriculum & Policy


Jasmine Mangrum

Jasmine Mangrum

Assistant Teaching Professor, Department of Pharmacy

Email: jmangr@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I believe that one way to make pharmacy better is to be inclusive of all people and their experiences. I hope that my contributions on this council will help allow faculty, staff, and especially students feel that no matter their identity that they are welcome at UWSOP and in the field of pharmacy.

Why is DEI important to you?
Institutional and structural racism are entrenched in our society so that those who are marginalized, unnoticed, and unheard never experience equity or justice. As an educator and provider, I aim to create equitable and inclusive environments where people are valued, while also fostering understanding and providing a space for people’s lived experiences. I hope that DEI at the UWSOP will allow students, faculty, and staff to explore the many identities of this global community and begin or continue to nurture the growth of themselves in this work.

Work group: Curriculum & Policy


Leigh Ann Mike

Leigh Ann Mike

Clinical Associate Professor

Email: laam@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I wanted to contribute to creating an environment in the School of Pharmacy that is diverse, equitable, inclusive, and just so that each person can reach their full potential in the classroom, in their profession, and beyond.

Work Group: Curriculum & Policy


Abhi Nath

Abhi Nath

Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry

Email: anath@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
As an alum and a faculty member, I’ve been very fortunate to have found a warm and supportive environment at the UWSOP. I want to help ensure that everyone here has similar opportunities to grow, to thrive, and to have their voice heard.

Why is DEI important to you?
We have a moral obligation to fight for a safe, equitable, inclusive and just environment for all – an environment in which each of us can reach our full potential.

Work groups: Recruitment, Retention & Professional Development; Curriculum & Policy


Steven Nguyen

Steven Nguyen

Email: nguyes5@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I hope to dedicate my time in a meaningful way to make the UWSOP a welcoming and equitable environment. When I was an undergraduate student, I was actively involved with various cultural, leadership, and other volunteering events that represented the underrepresented community, and I aspire to continue my work in pharmacy school.

Why is DEI important to you?
I believe that DEI and addressing healthcare disparities is essential to provide quality patient care as a future healthcare provider. DEI provides the chance to welcome everyone from all backgrounds, creating an environment that supports equal opportunities and growth.

Work Group: Curriculum & Policy


Carson Nibe

Carson Nibe

Administrative Specialist

Email: csnibe@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
As a member of the LGBTQ+ community, I want to ensure the UW SOP has a welcoming and equitable environment.

Work group: Communication & Community


Keiann Simon

Keiann Simon

PhD Student

Email: ksimon98@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
I am a success story of DEIC’s recruitment and as such I believe in paying that way forward by continuing to promote inclusivity and diversity in UWSOP.

Why is DEI important to you?
I believe that we are all entitled to have a safe and inclusive learning space coupled with a community that represents our cultures and interest.

Work group: Recruitment, Retention, & Professional Development


Tiffany Tran

Tiffany Tran

PharmD Student

Email: ttran98@uw.edu

What made you want to become a member of the DEIC?
As an undergraduate student, I was heavily involved in my cultural community and aided in serving an underrepresented community. I want to be able to utilize this experience to expand aid to other groups and help make UWSOP a more equitable, diverse, and welcoming environment for everyone.

Why is DEI important to you?
Lack of diversity and institutional racism are all things that run prevalent in all aspects of our society, including the healthcare field. As a future healthcare provider, it is important to be cognizant of how prevalent health disparities are and to work towards addressing that issue so that we have more equity and empowerment for the patients were are serving.

Work Group: Curriculum & Policy