July 1, 2016

Student’s enterprise yields 3 “essentially paid” for degrees

Blythe Adamson whiteboards a problem in health economics research with colleagues Nathaniel Hendrix, left, and Wei-Jhih Wang.

Blythe Adamson whiteboards a problem in health economics research with colleagues Nathaniel Hendrix, left, and Wei-Jhih Wang.Alex Levine Photography

Pharmacy Ph.D. candidate shares tips for self-funding success

You would think three degrees from the University of Washington would take an enormous financial toll, but School of Pharmacy grad student Blythe Adamson, one of the UW’s Husky 100, has been energetic and enterprising about finding funding.
“I will graduate with all three of my degrees essentially paid for through a variety of public and private support,” she shared.

Her secret: She applies for everything. “It’s a numbers game of sorts,” she figures, influenced by a colleague’s suggestion that if the average grant or fellowship acceptance rate is 13 percent, applying for at least 10 opportunities should land at least one. (The colleague had applied for 10 scholarships and received two.)

Over the past 18 months, Adamson applied for 20 scholarships. She initially received nine rejections in a row. “It was disheartening, but it gave me a thick skin about my research and writing.” Finally, the tide of turned and she received five awards.

Read the full story on UW Health Sciences NewsBeat: Student’s enterprise yields 3 ‘essentially paid for’ degrees: Pharmacy Ph.D. candidate shares tips for self-funding success

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