Course Overview

The following skills courses are designed to prepare students for their Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) in a community pharmacy setting (first year) and hospital pharmacy setting (second year) as well as many other courses in the curriculum. Student pharmacists are introduced to principles of current pharmacy practice based on the foundations of Pharmaceutical Care and Medication Therapy Management

Course Title: Pharm 585 (WIN), 586 (SPR)
Year level of students: First year (PY1)
Credits/quarter: 3

Overview: This course series promotes students to learn early problem solving and communication skills used in daily practice. The series is an integration of 5 previous courses: calculations, drug information, pharmacy practice, human behavior and communication, and public health screenings.

Course Structure: The class consists of one weekly 2-hour lecture and one weekly 2-hour skills session. The first hour of lecture normally covers a variety of general pharmacy practice topics; the second hour normally focuses on the most commonly prescribed medications and how patients should best use them. Information from each lecture session serves as the basis for skills activities.

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Course Goal

The goal of this course series is for students to be introduced to the practice of pharmaceutical care and medication therapy management (MTM) via lectures and practical skills sessions, and to prepare them for their Community IPPE.  This quarter,  students will begin to develop skills in clinical problem solving, enhancing adherence, educating patients about devices for medication administration, and focusing on patient-centered communication, provider communication and conflict resolution. Students will continue to practice pharmaceutical calculations, drug information and general medication counseling skills, as well as leadership and advocacy.

In addition to the pharmacy practice knowledge learned, students will have opportunities to enhance their communication, decision-making, team interaction and time management skills through active learning in the classroom. Development of professional responsibility and behavior are also goals of the course.

Click for more info about PHARM 586

Course Goal

The goal of this course series is for students to be introduced to the practice of pharmaceutical care and medication therapy management (MTM) via lectures and practical skills sessions, and to prepare them for their Community IPPE.  This quarter,  students will begin to develop skills in community health screenings, disease state management, and motivational interviewing. Students will continue to practice and hone their skills in pharmaceutical calculations, clinical problem solving, drug information, general medication counseling skills, leadership and advocacy, patient-centered communication and conflict resolution.

In addition to the pharmacy practice knowledge learned, students will have opportunities to enhance their communication, decision-making, team interaction and time management skills through active learning in the classroom. Development of professional responsibility and behavior are also goals of the course.

 


Course Title: Pharm 593 (WIN)
Year level of students: Second year (PY2)
Credits/quarter: 3

Overview: The skills portion of this course focuses on sterile product compounding, institutional product verification, electronic health records, transitions of care, communication, literature evaluation, and professionalism.

Course Structure: The class consists of two weekly 2-hour lectures and one weekly 2-hour skills session. The resident can expect their contributions to be devoted primarily toward the skills session.

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Skills Lab
Skills Lab Specific Learning Objectives

  1. Accurately prepare a sterile product using appropriate compounding and aseptic
    techniques.

    • Perform advanced pharmacy calculations related to intravenous (IV) products
      (including parenteral nutrition)
    •  Prepare at least two different sterile products
    • Perform final verification on at least ten different pre-prepared sterile products
    • Discuss the standards of practice and regulations as they relate to institutional
      pharmacy practice
  2. Accurately and effectively navigate an electronic health record (EHR) to gather
    information and process medication orders in the context of institutional pharmacy
    practice

    • Gather information from an electronic medical record
    • Enter a medication order into an electronic medical record
    • Verify ordered medications to ensure safe and effective use
  3. Evaluate safe and accurate IV administration via smart infusion pump
  4. Accurately and effectively transition patients from one care area to another
    • Perform a complete medication intake history
    • Conduct a thorough medication reconciliation to identify potential drug related
      problems
    • Counsel a patient, their agent, and healthcare providers on administration of
      medications (including injections) common to the institutional setting
    • Counsel a patient, their agent, and healthcare providers regarding discharge
      medications
  5. Communicate accurately and effectively, using a variety of methods, with patients,
    their agents, and healthcare providers

    • Demonstrate accurate and effective verbal and writing skills in communications to
      patients and other healthcare providers
    • Appropriately tailor communication of drug information to match the comprehension
      levels of patients, their agents, or/and providers
  6. Logically evaluate best evidence to individualize decisions about individual and
    population-based care

    • Research and prepare a medication monograph
    • Present a medication monograph to a mock Pharmacy and Therapeutics committee
  7. Demonstrate professional behaviors expected in professional classroom and
    workplace environments

    • Use time management skills effectively to accomplish assigned tasks
    • Work efficiently and diligently on course/skills activities
    • Work effectively with classmates on course/skills activities
    • Demonstrate respect for and sensitivity to oneself, peers, and instructors
    • Modify behaviors, if needed, based on feedback from instructors, peers

 


The following skills courses are designed to assist students in applying the knowledge learned in pharmacotherapeutics, adjust drug therapy to disease and patient-specific characteristics, and to communicate with other health care providers both orally and in writing. The instructors actively model assessment and formulating therapeutic decisions. These series of courses were designed to prepare students for their Advanced Practice Pharmacy Experience (APPE)/ clinical rotations.

Course Title: Pharm 563 (SPR), 564 (AUT), 565 (WIN)
Year level of students: Second year (PY2), Third year (PY3)
Credits/quarter: 3

Overview: This course provides instruction and practice in history-taking, physical examination, and assessment skills required for optimal patient care when making drug therapy decisions or recommendations and when monitoring patient response to drug therapy. Students will learn to obtain information through history taking and physical examination, interpret laboratory results, monitor drug therapy and disease state outcomes, review the medical literature, and evaluate patient cases.

Course Structure: This is a clinical skills course with a lecture component. The format consists of case-based discussion in small groups (pods), simulation-based learning (role-play, Standardized patients), and physical exam.

 

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The purpose of the Applied Pharmacotherapeutics course series is to help students further apply the knowledge acquired from the Pharmacotherapeutics series by taking into account disease – and patient- specific characteristics, and to communicate with other healthcare providers both orally and in writing. Students will learn to obtain information through history taking, physical examination, and review of medical records; interpret test results; monitor and adjust therapy to achieve desired disease state outcomes ; review the primary literature; and evaluate patient cases.
Learning Objectives

1. Use drug information sources to make informed decisions in a variety of heath care settings.

  • Retrieve, analyze, and interpret the medical literature to provide drug information and consult with patients and providers
  • Effectively and efficiently use guidelines and primary literature
  • Select resources that will accurately and efficiently locate appropriate drug and health information

2. Assess a patient’s health condition to make informed decisions about therapy

  • Conduct interviews and take medication histories
  • Determine pertinent positives and negatives in a patient case

3. Recommend disease – and patient – specific care plans to patients, their agents, and other healthcare providers.

  • Collect relevant patient information from a variety of sources
  • Review primary literature and apply information to make patient- specific recommendations
  • Justify therapeutic recommendations utilizing disease – and patient -specific factors
  • Promote rational medication use
  • Counsel patients, their agents, and healthcare providers on adverse reactions and monitoring associated with therapy

4. Monitor therapy regimens to provide safe patient care.

  • Monitor for adverse drug reactions
  • Recommend therapeutic drug monitoring when appropriate
  • Evaluate laboratory values and diagnostic reports
  • Refer patients to the appropriate level of care when required

5. Communicate effectively, using a variety of methods, with patients, their agents, providers, and the public.

  • Demonstrate accurate and effective writing skills in communications to patients and other healthcare providers
  • Demonstrate effective patient interviewing skills including motivational interviewing and other lifestyle modification techniques
  • Tailor communication of drug information to match the comprehension levels of patients, their agents, or/and providers
  • Perform patient presentations to colleagues upon request
  • Accurately communicate with patients about non-prescription drug products, devices, and diagnostics
  • Generate logical and timely written requests (e.g., SOAP note, clinical consults) to prescribers about optimization of a patient’s drug therapy

6. Demonstrate professional behaviors expected in professional classroom and workplace environments.

  • Use time management skills effectively to accomplish assigned tasks
  • Work efficiently and diligently on course/skills activities
  • Work effectively with classmates on course/skills activities
  • Demonstrate respect for and sensitivity to oneself, peers, and instructors
  • Modify behaviors, if needed, based on feedback